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If all goes as planned, Hillary Simani will be a millionaire in a few years. The Bachelor of Science in Animal Health (Egerton University) graduate’s farm in Vihiga is producing 400 eggs daily and with a market value of Sh 20 each, the 28 year old farmer rakes in about Sh 8,000 a day. With feed and other costs being about Sh 3,000 a day, Simani pockets about Sh 5,000 a day.

“Already, Simani is earning at least Sh 150, 000 a month and soon the figure will double when his Machakos poultry farm reaches its capacity”. 

And yet, he remote controls his farm operations from Machakos County where he stays. The Vihiga farm, where he hails from, is under his parents and a few employees .

After graduating in 2008 from Egerton University, he got a job at an Agrovet’s shop in Nakuru but the income was peanuts. He moved to Machakos in search of green pastures three years ago.
Indeed,  he found greener pastures there. While he started the Vihiga farm with 83 chicks, which has now risen to 640, the Machakos farm has even bigger prospects. Here, he has a stock of over 800 layers and more than 500 chicks.

Soon, he projects to collect 600 eggs a day from the farm. With an average price of Sh 10 per egg, Simani could rake in Sh 180,000 a month. Add that to the Vihiga income and the young man could earn at least Sh 300,000 a month by the end of the year.

Interestingly, Simani has his chicken incubator in his bedroom. The incubator was loaned to him by the Youth Enterprise Fund early in the year.

“I was passionate about poultry farming from an early age. I just wanted to fully exploit it when I decided to leave my agrovet job,” says Simani.

Simani, who carries out extension services to farmers in Machakos and Makueni Counties, is currently hatching his own Kienyenji chicken. By the end of the year, he will pay up the incubator’s loan that amounted to Sh 20,000.

“Success in farming requires patience. Profits come slowly,” says Simani. He says chicken are delicate animals and require close management to yield profits.

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